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Top Data Management Trends for Chief Data Officers (CDOs)

Chief Data Officer (CDOs) 2021 Study

The role of chief data officer (CDO) is becoming essential at forward-thinking organizations — especially those in financial services — according to “The Evolving Role of the CDO at Financial Organizations: 2021 Chief Data Officer (CDO) Study” just released by FIMA and sponsored by erwin.

The e-guide takes a deep dive into the evolving role of CDOs at financial organizations, tapping into the minds of 100+ financial global financial leaders and C-suite executives to look at the latest trends and provide a roadmap for developing an offensive data management strategy.

Data Governance Is Not Just About Compliance

Interestingly, the report found that 45% of respondents say compliance is now handled so well that it is no longer the top driver for data governance, while 38% say they have fully realized a “governance 2.0” model in which the majority of their compliance concerns are fully automated.”

Chief data officers and other data professionals have taken significant steps toward a data governance model that doesn’t just safeguard data but also drives business improvements.

erwin also found this to be the case as revealed in our 2020 “State of Data Governance and Automation” report.

However, while compliance is no longer the top driver of data governance, it still requires a significant investment. According to the CDO report, 88% of organizations devote 40% or more of their data practice’s operating budget to compliance activities.

COVID’s Impact on Data Management

FIMA also looked at 2020 and the pandemic’s impact on data management.

Some financial organizations that were approaching a significant level of data management maturity had to put their initiatives on hold to address more immediate issues. But it led some sectors to innovate, moving processes that were once manual to the digital realm.

The research team asked respondents to describe how their data practices were impacted by the need to adapt to changes in the work environment created by COVID-19. “Overall, most respondents said they avoided any catastrophic impact on their data operations. Most of these respondents note the fact that they had been updating their tools and programs ahead of time to prepare for such risks, and those investments inevitably paid off.”

The respondents who did note that the pandemic caused a disruption repeatedly said that they nonetheless managed to “keep everything in check.” As one CIO at an investment bank puts it, “Data practices became more precise and everyone got more conscious as the pandemic reached its first peak. Key programs have been kept in check and have been restarted securely.”

What Keeps CDOs Up at Night

Financial services organizations are usually at the forefront of data management and governance because they operate in such a heavily regulated environment. So it’s worth knowing what’s on those data executives’ minds, even if your organization is in another sector.

For example, the FIMA study indicates that:

  • 70% of CDOs say risk data aggregation is a primary regulatory concern within the IT departments.
  • Compliance is secondary to overall business improvement, but 88% of organizations devote 40%+ of their data practice’s operating budget to it.
  • Lack of downstream visibility into data consumption (69%) and unclear data provenance and tagging information (65%) are significant challenges.
  • They struggle to apply metadata.
  • Manual processes remain.

The e-guide discusses how data executives must not only secure data and meet rigorous data requirements but also find ways to create new business value with it.

All CDOs and other data professionals likely must deal with the challenges mentioned above – plus improve customer outcomes and boost profitability.

Both mitigating risk and unleashing potential is possible with the right tools, including data catalog, data literacy and metadata-driven automation capabilities for data governance and any other data-centric use case.

Harmonizing Data Management and Data Governance Processes

With erwin Data Intelligence by Quest, your organization can harness and activate your data in a single, unified catalog and then make it available to your data communities in context and in line with business requirements.

The solution harmonizes data management and governance processes to fuel an automated, real-time, high-quality data pipeline enterprise stakeholders can tap into for the information they need to achieve results. Such data intelligence leads to faster, smarter decisions to improve overall organizational performance.

Data is governed properly throughout its lifecycle, meeting both offensive and defensive data management needs. erwin Data Intelligence provides total data visibility, end-to-end data lineage and provenance.

To download the full “The Evolving Role of the CDO at Financial Organizations: 2021 Chief Data Officer (CDO) Study,” please visit: https://go.erwin.com/the-evolving-role-of-the-cdo-at-financial-organizations-report.

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Top 10 Data Governance Predictions for 2019

This past year witnessed a data governance awakening – or as the Wall Street Journal called it, a “global data governance reckoning.” There was tremendous data drama and resulting trauma – from Facebook to Equifax and from Yahoo to Marriott. The list goes on and on. And then, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) took effect, with many organizations scrambling to become compliant.

So what’s on the horizon for data governance in the year ahead? We’re making the following data governance predictions for 2019:

Data Governance Predictions

Top 10 Data Governance Predictions for 2019

1. GDPR-esque regulation for the United States:

GDPR has set the bar and will become the de facto standard across geographies. Look at California as an example with California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) going into effect in 2020. Even big technology companies like Apple, Google, Amazon and Twitter are encouraging more regulations in part because they realize that companies that don’t put data privacy at the forefront will feel the wrath from both the government and the consumer.

2. GDPR fines are coming and they will be massive:

Perhaps one of the safest data governance predictions for 2019 is the coming clamp down on GDPR enforcement. The regulations weren’t brought in for show and so it’s likely the fine-free streak for GDPR will be ending … and soon. The headlines will resemble data breaches or hospitals with Health Information Portability Privacy Act (HIPAA) violations in the U.S. healthcare sector. Lots of companies will have an “oh crap” moment and realize they have a lot more to do to get their compliance house in order.

3. Data policies as a consumer buying criteria:

The threat of “data trauma” will continue to drive visibility for enterprise data in the C-suite. How they respond will be the key to their long-term success in transforming data into a true enterprise asset. We will start to see a clear delineation between organizations that maintain a reactive and defensive stance (pain avoidance) versus those that leverage this negative driver as an impetus to increase overall data visibility and fluency across the enterprise with a focus on opportunity enablement. The latter will drive the emergence of true data-driven entities versus those that continue to try to plug the holes in the boat.

4. CDOs will rise, better defined role within the organization:

We will see the chief data officer (CDO) role elevated from being a lieutenant of the CIO to taking a proper seat at the table beside the CIO, CMO and CFO.  This will give them the juice needed to create a sustainable vision and roadmap for data. So far, there’s been a profound lack of consensus on the nature of the role and responsibilities, mandate and background that qualifies a CDO. As data becomes increasingly more vital to an organization’s success from a compliance and business perspective, the role of the CDO will become more defined.

5. Data operations (DataOps) gains traction/will be fully optimized:

Much like how DevOps has taken hold over the past decade, 2019 will see a similar push for DataOps. Data is no longer just an IT issue. As organizations become data-driven and awash in an overwhelming amount of data from multiple data sources (AI, IOT, ML, etc.), organizations will need to get a better handle on data quality and focus on data management processes and practices. DataOps will enable organizations to better democratize their data and ensure that all business stakeholders work together to deliver quality, data-driven insights.

Data Management and Data Governance

6. Business process will move from back office to center stage:

Business process management will make its way out of the back office and emerge as a key component to digital transformation. The ability for an organization to model, build and test automated business processes is a gamechanger. Enterprises can clearly define, map and analyze workflows and build models to drive process improvement as well as identify business practices susceptible to the greatest security, compliance or other risks and where controls are most needed to mitigate exposures.

7. Turning bad AI/ML data good:

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are consumers of data. The risk of training AI and ML applications with bad data will initially drive the need for data governance to properly govern the training data sets. Once trained, the data they produce should be well defined, consistent and of high quality. The data needs to be continuously governed for assurance purposes.

8. Managing data from going over the edge:

Edge computing will continue to take hold. And while speed of data is driving its adoption, organizations will also need to view, manage and secure this data and bring it into an automated pipeline. The internet of things (IoT) is all about new data sources (device data) that often have opaque data structures. This data is often integrated and aggregated with other enterprise data sources and needs to be governed like any other data. The challenge is documenting all the different device management information bases (MIBS) and mapping them into the data lake or integration hub.

9. Organizations that don’t have good data harvesting are doomed to fail:

Research shows that data scientists and analysts spend 80 percent of their time preparing data for use and only 20 percent of their time actually analyzing it for business value. Without automated data harvesting and ingesting data from all enterprise sources (not just those that are convenient to access), data moving through the pipeline won’t be the highest quality and the “freshest” it can be. The result will be faulty intelligence driving potentially disastrous decisions for the business.

10. Data governance evolves to data intelligence:

Regulations like GDPR are driving most large enterprises to address their data challenges. But data governance is more than compliance. “Best-in-breed” enterprises are looking at how their data can be used as a competitive advantage. These organizations are evolving their data governance practices to data intelligence – connecting all of the pieces of their data management and data governance lifecycles to create actionable insights. Data intelligence can help improve the customer experiences and enable innovation of products and services.

The erwin Expert Blog will continue to follow data governance trends and provide best practice advice in the New Year so you can see how our data governance predictions pan out for yourself. To stay up to date, click here to subscribe.

Data Management and Data Governance: Solving the Enterprise Data Dilemma

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The Data Governance (R)Evolution

Data governance continues to evolve – and quickly.

Historically, Data Governance 1.0 was siloed within IT and mainly concerned with cataloging data to support search and discovery. However, it fell short in adding value because it neglected the meaning of data assets and their relationships within the wider data landscape.

Then the push for digital transformation and Big Data created the need for DG to come out of IT’s shadows – Data Governance 2.0 was ushered in with principles designed for  modern, data-driven business. This approach acknowledged the demand for collaborative data governance, the tearing down of organizational silos, and spreading responsibilities across more roles.

But this past year we all witnessed a data governance awakening – or as the Wall Street Journal called it, a “global data governance reckoning.” There was tremendous data drama and resulting trauma – from Facebook to Equifax and from Yahoo to Aetna. The list goes on and on. And then, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) took effect, with many organizations scrambling to become compliant.

So where are we today?

Simply put, data governance needs to be a ubiquitous part of your company’s culture. Your stakeholders encompass both IT and business users in collaborative relationships, so that makes data governance everyone’s business.

Data Governance is Everyone's Business

Data governance underpins data privacy, security and compliance. Additionally, most organizations don’t use all the data they’re flooded with to reach deeper conclusions about how to grow revenue, achieve regulatory compliance, or make strategic decisions. They face a data dilemma: not knowing what data they have or where some of it is—plus integrating known data in various formats from numerous systems without a way to automate that process.

To accelerate the transformation of business-critical information into accurate and actionable insights, organizations need an automated, real-time, high-quality data pipeline. Then every stakeholder—data scientist, ETL developer, enterprise architect, business analyst, compliance officer, CDO and CEO—can fuel the desired outcomes based on reliable information.

Connecting Data Governance to Your Organization

  1. Data Mapping & Data Governance

The automated generation of the physical embodiment of data lineage—the creation, movement and transformation of transactional and operational data for harmonization and aggregation—provides the best route for enabling stakeholders to understand their data, trust it as a well-governed asset and use it effectively. Being able to quickly document lineage for a standardized, non-technical environment brings business alignment and agility to the task of building and maintaining analytics platforms.

  1. Data Modeling & Data Governance

Data modeling discovers and harvests data schema, and analyzes, represents and communicates data requirements. It synthesizes and standardizes data sources for clarity and consistency to back up governance requirements to use only controlled data. It benefits from the ability to automatically map integrated and cataloged data to and from models, where they can be stored in a central repository for re-use across the organization.

  1. Business Process Modeling & Data Governance

Business process modeling reveals the workflows, business capabilities and applications that use particular data elements. That requires that these assets be appropriately governed components of an integrated data pipeline that rests on automated data lineage and business glossary creation.

  1. Enterprise Architecture & Data Governance

Data flows and architectural diagrams within enterprise architecture benefit from the ability to automatically assess and document the current data architecture. Automatically providing and continuously maintaining business glossary ontologies and integrated data catalogs inform a key part of the governance process.

The EDGE Revolution

 By bringing together enterprise architecturebusiness processdata mapping and data modeling, erwin’s approach to data governance enables organizations to get a handle on how they handle their data and realize its maximum value. With the broadest set of metadata connectors and automated code generation, data mapping and cataloging tools, the erwin EDGE Platform simplifies the total data management and data governance lifecycle.

This single, integrated solution makes it possible to gather business intelligence, conduct IT audits, ensure regulatory compliance and accomplish any other organizational objective by fueling an automated, high-quality and real-time data pipeline.

The erwin EDGE creates an “enterprise data governance experience” that facilitates collaboration between both IT and the business to discover, understand and unlock the value of data both at rest and in motion.

With the erwin EDGE, data management and data governance are unified and mutually supportive of business stakeholders and IT to:

  • Discover data: Identify and integrate metadata from various data management silos.
  • Harvest data: Automate the collection of metadata from various data management silos and consolidate it into a single source.
  • Structure data: Connect physical metadata to specific business terms and definitions and reusable design standards.
  • Analyze data: Understand how data relates to the business and what attributes it has.
  • Map data flows: Identify where to integrate data and track how it moves and transforms.
  • Govern data: Develop a governance model to manage standards and policies and set best practices.
  • Socialize data: Enable stakeholders to see data in one place and in the context of their roles.

If you’ve enjoyed this latest blog series, then you’ll want to request a copy of Solving the Enterprise Data Dilemma, our new e-book that highlights how to answer the three most important data management and data governance questions: What data do we have? Where is it? And how do we get value from it?

Solving the Enterprise Data Dilemma

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GDPR, Compliance Concerns Driving Data Governance Strategies

There are many factors driving data governance adoption, as revealed in erwin’s State of Data Governance Report. Over the coming weeks, we’ll be exploring them in detail, starting with regulatory compliance.

By Michael Pastore

Almost every organization views data governance as important, so why don’t they all have it in place?

Modern organizations run on data. Whether from sensors monitoring equipment on a factory floor or a customer’s purchasing history, data enters modern businesses from every angle, gets stored in any number of places, and is used by many different people and applications.

Data governance refers to the practices that help businesses understand where their data comes from, where it resides, how accurate it is, who or what can access it, and how it can be used. The idea of data governance is not new, but putting data governance into practice and reaping the benefits remains a struggle for many organizations.

According to our November 2017 survey with UBM, nearly all (98 percent) respondents said their organizations view data governance as either important or critically important from a business perspective. Despite this, 46 percent of respondents indicated their organizations recognize the value of data, but lack a formal governance strategy.

One of the significant obstacles to data governance for many organizations is the idea of ownership. In many businesses, it’s safe to say that the IT organization has ownership over the network, just as it’s easy to say that the business oversees payroll.

Data is a bit more complicated. The business side of the organization often analyzes the data, but it’s the IT organization that stores and protects it. This data division of labor often leaves data governance in a sort of no-man’s land, with each side expecting the other to pick up the torch.

The results of the erwin-UBM survey indicate that businesses are increasingly treating data governance as an enterprise-wide imperative. At 57 percent of respondents’ organizations, both IT and the business are responsible for data governance. Just 34 percent of the organizations put IT solely in charge.

Strong data governance initiatives will overcome the issue of ownership thanks in part to a new organizational structure that considers the importance of data. The emergence of the chief data officer (CDO) is one sign that businesses recognize the vital role of their data.

Many of the first generation of CDOs reported to the CIO. Now, you’re more likely to see the CDO at forward-thinking organizations sit on the business side, perhaps in the finance department, or even marketing, which is a huge consumer of data in many businesses. Under the CDO, it’s increasingly likely to find a data protection officer (DPO) tasked with overseeing how the business safeguards its information.

What's Driving Data Governance

Driving Data Governance: Compliance Is Leading Organizations to Data Governance

Now is a good time for businesses to re-think their data structure and governance initiatives. Data is central to organizations’ compliance, privacy and security initiatives because it has value — value to the business; value to the customer; and, like anything of value, value to criminals who want to get their hands on it.

The need to protect data and reduce risk is an important factor in driving data governance at many organizations. In fact, our survey found that regulatory compliance, cited by 60 percent of respondents, was the most popular factor driving data governance.

There’s an increased sense of urgency regarding data governance and compliance because of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which goes into effect this month. According to our research, only 6 percent of respondents said their organization was “completely prepared” for the regulation.

Not only does the GDPR protect EU citizens at home, but it extends protections to EU citizens wherever they do business. It really goes much farther than any other legislation ever has.

The GDPR essentially gives rights to the people the data represents, so businesses must:

  • Minimize identifiability in data
  • Report data breaches within 72 hours
  • Give consumers the ability to dispute data and demand data portability
  • Understand the GDPR’s expanded definition of personally identifiable information (PII)
  • Extend to consumers the right to be “forgotten”

And much, much more.

The maximum fine for organizations in breach of the GDPR is up to 4 percent of annual global turnover or €20 million, whichever is greater. And because the GDPR will apply to anyone doing business with EU citizens, and the internet transcends international borders, it’s likely the GDPR will become the standard organizations around the world will need to rise to meet.

The GDPR is a hot topic right now, but it’s not the only data-security regulation organizations have to honor. In addition to Payment Card Industry (PCI) standards for payment processors, industry-specific regulations exist in such areas as financial services, healthcare and education.

This web of regulations brings us back to data governance. Simply put, it’s easier to protect data and mitigate a breach if your organization knows where the data comes from, where it is stored, and what it includes.

Businesses stand to gain a number of advantages by implementing strong data governance. Regulatory compliance is sure to get the attention of C-level executives, the legal team and the board, but it means very little to consumers – until there’s a breach.

With new breaches being reported on a seemingly daily basis, businesses that practice strong data governance can help build a competitive advantage by better protecting their data and gaining a reputation as an organization that can be trusted in a way that firms suffering from high-profile breaches cannot. In this way, data governance helps contribute directly to the bottom line.

Still, compliance is the No. 1 factor driving data governance initiatives for a reason.

Using data governance to drive upside growth is great, but not if you’re going to lose money in fines.

In our next post in this series, we’ll explore how your organization can use data governance to build trust with your customers.

 

Michael Pastore is the Director, Content Services at QuinStreet B2B Tech. This content originally appeared as a sponsored post on http://www.eweek.com/.

Learn more about how data governance can help with GDPR compliance by downloading the free white paper: GDPR and Your Business: A Call to Enhance Data Governance Expertise.

Data Governance and GDPR: GDPR and Your Business Whitepaper